Collaborizm
matthen:

Another interesting property of the logarithmic spiral is revealed if you roll it along a horizontal line. This animation shows the curves traced by points on the spiral, and note that the very centre follows the path of a straight line. The angle between this line and the horizontal is called the pitch of the spiral, and for our spiral galaxy the pitch is around 12 degrees. [more] [code] 

matthen:

Another interesting property of the logarithmic spiral is revealed if you roll it along a horizontal line. This animation shows the curves traced by points on the spiral, and note that the very centre follows the path of a straight line. The angle between this line and the horizontal is called the pitch of the spiral, and for our spiral galaxy the pitch is around 12 degrees. [more] [code

Collaboration in the Maker Community

There are many new platforms emerging in the online maker community. These platforms generally address three primary topics:

- Sharing personal DIY projects

- Instructions for specific maker projects

- Platforms to purchase parts and prototype services

We believe it’s time to give this cutting edge group of creative tinkerers (makers) a platform to create together. We also believe that many makers may be aspiring entrepreneurs. We encourage the idea of artists working with electrical engineers. However, we also want to assist mechatronics hackers working with experienced business people. It is this cross pollination of thought and experience that will drive the evolution of the maker community. Metaphorically, until now, makers may be fixated with making “toys”, but now they will be able to collaborate to make self-assembling robots that one day may care for our pets, and perform tasks that improve our quality of life on Earth. 

-See more at: http://collaborizm.com/blog/

The Power of Online Credentials

image

Wow, you were endorsed for “Private Equity” or “Marketing” or some other topic on Linkedin; you must be really well versed in those topics!! On second thought, perhaps not. Since Linkedin does not vet the relatively new skill endorsement feature on their site, anyone - your friend or even a relative can endorse you without much regard to whether you are an “expert” or a rank amateur at the particular skill. Nevertheless, the apparent popularity of this feature suggests that people like assigning and having online “credentials”, even if they are not confirmed in some formal manner.

Some sites try to assign credentials to people for their online (plus non-traditional offline) accomplishments like Credly (www.credly.com) and Mozilla Open Badges (https://wiki.mozilla.org/Badges), both of which use digital badges to connote expertise or some accomplishment that are not generally associated with skills included in typical resumes. The idea is that in today’s society, people are engaged in so many activities both online and offline, that it makes sense to document all of their skills anwww.credly.com) and Mozilla Open Badges (https://wiki.mozilla.org/Badges), both of which use digital badges to connote expertise or some accomplishment that are not generally associated with skills included in typical resumes. The idea is that in today’s society, people are engaged in so many activities both online and offline, that it makes sense to document all of their skills and achievements - not just ones that have been traditionally recognized.

Some sites like Wiggio have developed the concept of an “ePortfolio”, which encourages college students to highlight their accomplishments via a URL that includes samples of their work displayed creatively, as opposed to statically on a paper resume.(See: http://blog.wiggio.com/top-reasons-to-use-an-eportfolio). This trend towards capturing and documenting one’s “holistic” achievements is one of the most beneficial developments in the world of social networking, and finally credits people for skills they exhibit outside the office.

Endorsing people and the idea of eportfolios is likely to create positive change in the online collaboration industry. Imagine the value to people using collaboration software of being able to “judge” potential collaborators by way of badges they’ve attained for certain skills or achievements. Users would benefit from being able to tout the badge status they’ve earned online, to potential employers. The combination of “gamification” embedded in digital badges and the value provided by assigning credibility to previously unheralded achievements via eportolios are trends that are worth following closely.   - See more at: http://collaborizm.com/blog/#sthash.83vDGASw.dpuf

Intel’s Partnership w/ Arduino Sheds New Light on the “Internet of Things”

We’ve all heard the buzz around the so called “internet of things.” But what exactly does that term mean? It certainly sounds cool and cutting edge, but what evidence is there to support claims that this will usher in a hardware revolution?

The seeds were planted for this new concept by the fairly recent trend of drastically decreased cost of prototyping physical products. Mechanical engineer Joe and designer Katie no longer need to raise $400K to build their souped-up coffee maker, “The Supreme Latte 2.0.” All they need is to believe that if they invest the time, execute on their skill sets, they’ll be able to push their concept forward, without incurring major debt. That increased belief stems from two core entrepreneurial trends progressing on the internet.

One of them is crowdfunding. Thanks to sites like Kickstarter, Indiegogo and Rockethub, it is easier than ever for startups to raise money for new product development. Pebble’s success raising over 6 million dollars on Kickstarter for its Pebble Watch – without shelling out any equity – is a testament to the power of this fundraising tool for entrepreneurs.

The second major trend driving this concept is the increasing feasibility to implement and prototype – sorry for the big word – mechatronics. Mechatronics is any type of physical device that in some way, shape or form, uses digital interfaces to control the movement of physical devices. Think robots, coffee makers, cars, and open source thermostats (e.g., Nest.com). A few years ago, you needed a custom computer to implement mechatronics. You’d need to be a powerful manufacturer of computer chips, with an extremely savvy software division, to customize a micro computer for whatever device you were going to sell (e.g., Nintendo.)

How quickly things have changed! The microcontroller was born, the most notable being the Arduino board, and it gets easier by the day to program one of these things (i.e., easier for an engineer, or tecchie; you are not going to pick up one of these things and master it without a programming/engineering background). It required the confluence of three major trends to allow for such disruptive technology: the vision, the funding opportunities, and the extremely cheap technology to prototype and implement sophisticated products in a “DIY” manner (you can buy an Arduino for 14 bucks).

Intel and General Electric are two major U.S. companies at the forefront of the “internet of things” movement. With the support of such powerhouse corporations that are drivers of innovation, (Intel is promoting this concept by partnering with select universities; GE has open sourced many of its patents in partnership with Quirky to drive consumer product innovation including Internet of Things), the maker movement has the potential to incite an industrial revolution of epic proportions. Moreover, new collaboration tools will drastically enhance the ability of these makers to connect and spark new, serendipitous opportunities on the web. The dynamic of online team building platforms will lead these makers to creating wonderful new products even quicker. After all, the maker movement is not about programming a new design of Nike sneakers into your home 3d printer and mass producing them –it’s much bigger. It signifies the dawn of a new era of human thought and collaboration, and to solve problems faster then we have ever imagined.

- See more at: http://collaborizm.com/blog/#sthash.hrFSZ3pC.dpuf

Focus on Small Achievements

The problem with most founders is that they are so enamored of their idea that they lack objectivity and overlook the discipline that is needed to test and prove their concept, and they are overly optimistic about user adoption. So their “go to market” strategy is overly broad and targets too many markets, and for most startups living on tight budgets, the modest PR they can afford is unlikely to help them develop a meaningful user base, much less a rapidly growing one.

A common bit of advice we have gotten from our most trusted mentors as well as from the founders of more mature startups is to “start small” and target a particular market that we are most confident will embrace our service. It sounds simple, right? But it actually requires some candid “self assessment” and a commitment to a defined process to employ successfully.

For example, we believe that Collaborizm is an online collaboration tool that should appeal to anyone interested in or whom would benefit from collaboration, such as entrepreneurs broadly, and more specifically people engaged in complex endeavors like engineers as well as creative people including artists and writers. We could therefore try to engage many different potential “collaboration communities” but by doing so we’d minimize our impact and our likelihood of gaining meaningful traction.

We are much better off, we believe, based on what our mentors have instilled in us, focusing on one or perhaps two target markets. One such market is Coworking Spaces, the rapidly growing phenomenon of people affiliated with different businesses – generally startups – working together under one roof. The guiding principle of Coworking spaces is that not only is much more cost effective to work in shared workspaces but that collaboration is an immensely valuable byproduct enhanced by such organizations. The fact that this industry is experiencing hyper growth is a testament to users appreciating and benefitting from such a collaborative atmosphere, as startups serendipitously engage and help each other.

We believe that Coworking spaces should embrace an effective, playful virtual collaboration tool which we designed Collaborizm to be, because it perfectly complements the physical collaboration of such spaces. However, abiding by the advice we’ve been given to start small, we intend to not only focus on this particular market but to literally focus on one particular location of a company in this industry. Our thought is that if we can persuade the branch manager of a particular Coworking Space to introduce his/her members to our service, and if users try it and relate a very productive, satisfying experience finding ideal collaborators using our platform, we can use that feedback to promote our service elsewhere. Hopefully, this approach of testing our service in a very concentrated way yields useful feedback that we would unlikely to garner from a more scattershot approach.

- See more at: http://collaborizm.com/blog/

The State of Social Media
Check out geekboy.it, the open community for electronics and programming, and follow Collaborizm on Twitter & Tumblr for the most powerful tech & art collaboration tips on the web.
@Collaborizm

Check out geekboy.it, the open community for electronics and programming, and follow Collaborizm on Twitter & Tumblr for the most powerful tech & art collaboration tips on the web.

@Collaborizm

Collaboration software for entrepreneurs, artists, & engineers! Follow us for the latest news on creative collaboration tools around the web!

Collaboration software for entrepreneurs, artists, & engineers! Follow us for the latest news on creative collaboration tools around the web!